How do we solve the problem of migrated processes?

A comment I’ve heard more than once deals with an amazing contrast between outsourcing to India compared to outsourcing to the Philippines. They say that once a process is migrated to India, the Indian processors immediately huddle around to decide on how to tinker with the process, see how it could be done differently and improved. For many young Filipinos, the experience of process migration almost inevitably creates a bond of friendship between the sending location process owner and the Filipino receiving location staff. The desk operating manual is a testament to that newfound friendship and the newly assigned processor will always be faithful to the process as-migrated.

It is not necessarily a bad thing that we Pinoys treat the newly landed process as gospel-truth. The continuing familiarity with the offshored process does create a sense of comfort for the sending location’s residual organization. Managing to settle things down also creates trust and is an important quick win.

But process improvement is important too. Sadly, that desk operating manual is not gospel-truth – far from it. In all likelihood it is a stark description of a broken or an outdated process. So, how do we get our Pinoy teams to embrace change?

BPO Office

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2 thoughts on “How do we solve the problem of migrated processes?

  1. Very interesting and although I have to agree there is a quick win for the “sending” organization, there may be a time bound threshold that allows for innovation to continue at the Philippine organization taking on the work.

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  2. “Sadly, that desk operating manual is not gospel-truth – far from it. In all likelihood it is a stark description of a broken or an outdated process.” -> Very true, from my personal experience I found it surprising that this is fairly common even in supposedly bulge-bracket international organizations.

    Back to the topic, I think Pinoys in general should be more comfortable in challenging the status quo or even authority if necessary. Our culture discourages this behavior. Also we have this colonial mentality so if Juan finds it already intimidating to challenge his Pinoy manager, what more his confident, straight English-talking counterpart in London?

    But being in shared services and BPOs the clients are based overseas and are most likely to take criticism more openly than the average Pinoy managers and clients. Companies should empower employees, being in shared services does not necessarily mean they are inferior to their onshore counterparts. Moreover Pinoys should have a stronger belief and confidence in themselves as Pinoys.

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